After Scotland and India, it is Western Australia who visits Infinitum to learn about the deposit-based plastic waste recycling
After Scotland and India, it is Western Australia who visits Infinitum to learn about the deposit-based plastic waste recycling

Infinitum´s deposit refund system finds more international takers

After Scotland and India, it is Western Australia who visits Infinitum to learn about the deposit-based plastic waste recycling model.

With plastic waste becoming a global menace, Infinitum´s avant-garde and cost-effective deposit refund system catches on the international market. After recent visits by delegations from Scotland and India, Infinitum received a delegation from the West Australian government (WA) in late May.

In a bid to assist the waste industry transition to a ´circular economy´, the WA government is looking up to innovative solutions by countries like Norway who is considered world leaders in this space. A delegation from WA led by Minister for Environment, Stephen Dawson, visited Infinitum to learn about their cost-effective container deposit scheme, popularly known as reverse vending system. He was accompanied by Dr. Shaun Meredith, Senior Policy Adviser for the Minister for Environment and Mike Rowe, Director General, Department of Water and Environmental Regulation.

According to Minister Dawson, WA shall embark on the container deposit scheme by 2020.   “Over the next year and half or so, we are going to bring in the container deposit scheme in Western Australia. As world leaders in this space, Norway does it differently than many other countries. So, we want to learn how it works here, what the challenges are, what experiences that you have been through that we should and shouldn´t go through so that we can have good if not the best system in the world,” said Dawson, while interacting with the leadership team at Infinitum.

However, when the entire world clamours for plastic ban, Kjell Olav Maldum, the Managing Director of Infinitum, claims otherwise. “Plastic ban is not the solution”, he said. “We need to educate people to recycle. We have to make sure that we do the packaging right so as to enable people to sort, deposit, recycle and reuse it.” According to him, plastic is the most efficient material. “It is cheap, easy to recycle and if you look into the environmental impact, emission production and energy consumption of plastic is much lower than glass”, he added.

Plastic waste is a global menace. And, Infinitum is keen to share the successful Norwegian model to help countries find sustainable solutions to waste management crisis.  That´s why, Infinitum welcomes international delegations at their facility to share knowledge, experiences, challenges and learnings to not only offer the most cost-efficient way of tackling plastic litter but also to improve upon their existing deposit-based system for recycling bottles. “We are delighted to share our successful model with the world and help countries effectively battle the waste management crisis. Besides, quite often, questions raised by visiting delegates inspire us to make beneficial changes to our existing system as well.” 

Infinitum´s deposit refund system finds more international takers

After Scotland and India, it is Western Australia who visits Infinitum to learn about the deposit-based plastic waste recycling model.

With plastic waste becoming a global menace, Infinitum´s avant-garde and cost-effective deposit refund system catches on the international market. After recent visits by delegations from Scotland and India, Infinitum received a delegation from the West Australian government (WA) in late May.

In a bid to assist the waste industry transition to a ´circular economy´, the WA government is looking up to innovative solutions by countries like Norway who is considered world leaders in this space. A delegation from WA led by Minister for Environment, Stephen Dawson, visited Infinitum to learn about their cost-effective container deposit scheme, popularly known as reverse vending system. He was accompanied by Dr. Shaun Meredith, Senior Policy Adviser for the Minister for Environment and Mike Rowe, Director General, Department of Water and Environmental Regulation.

According to Minister Dawson, WA shall embark on the container deposit scheme by 2020.   “Over the next year and half or so, we are going to bring in the container deposit scheme in Western Australia. As world leaders in this space, Norway does it differently than many other countries. So, we want to learn how it works here, what the challenges are, what experiences that you have been through that we should and shouldn´t go through so that we can have good if not the best system in the world,” said Dawson, while interacting with the leadership team at Infinitum.

However, when the entire world clamours for plastic ban, Kjell Olav Maldum, the Managing Director of Infinitum, claims otherwise. “Plastic ban is not the solution”, he said. “We need to educate people to recycle. We have to make sure that we do the packaging right so as to enable people to sort, deposit, recycle and reuse it.” According to him, plastic is the most efficient material. “It is cheap, easy to recycle and if you look into the environmental impact, emission production and energy consumption of plastic is much lower than glass”, he added.

Plastic waste is a global menace. And, Infinitum is keen to share the successful Norwegian model to help countries find sustainable solutions to waste management crisis.  That´s why, Infinitum welcomes international delegations at their facility to share knowledge, experiences, challenges and learnings to not only offer the most cost-efficient way of tackling plastic litter but also to improve upon their existing deposit-based system for recycling bottles. “We are delighted to share our successful model with the world and help countries effectively battle the waste management crisis. Besides, quite often, questions raised by visiting delegates inspire us to make beneficial changes to our existing system as well.”